Licence Agreement Laws

A frequent criticism of end-user licensing agreements is that they are often far too long for users to have time to read them in depth. As of March 2012, the end-user PayPal license agreement was 36,275 words[15] and by May 2011, the iTunes agreement was 56 pages long. [16] The message sources that reported these results stated that the vast majority of users do not read documents because of their length. A lease gives the tenant rights to the property, while a license is just an agreement with the owner for the use of the space. This means that a tenant has certain rights and a higher guarantee under a lease agreement than a licensed licensee. Unlike ITAs, open source software licenses do not function as a contractual extension of existing legislation. No agreement is ever reached between the parties, as a copyright license is simply a statement of permission for something that would otherwise not be allowed by default by copyright. [2] Several companies have parodied this belief that users do not read end-user licensing agreements by adding unusual clauses, knowing that few users will ever read them. Aprilscherz added a clause according to which users who placed an order on April 1, 2010 agreed to irrevocably give their soul to the company, which 7500 users accepted.

Although there was a box to be exempted from the “soul immorts” clause, few users checked it and Gamestation concluded that 88% of their users had not read the agreement. [17] The PC Pitstop program contained a clause in its end-user license agreement that states that anyone who reads the clause and contacts the company receives a financial reward, but it took four months and more than 3,000 software downloads before anyone collected it. [18] During the installation of advanced query version 4, Setup measured the time between the appearance and acceptance of end-user license agreements to calculate the average read speed. While the agreements were adopted fairly quickly, a dialog box “praised” users for their absurd reading speed of several hundred words per second. [19] South Park parodied him in the episode “HumancentiPad,” in which Kyle failed to read the terms of use of his latest iTunes update and therefore inadvertently agreed to have him experiment with Apple employees. [20] Although the terms of license agreements are different, both parties must agree on the following: end-user license agreements are usually drafted in a very specific legal language, making it more difficult for the average user to give informed consent. [3] If the company designs the end-user license agreement in a way that deliberately deters users from reading it and uses language that is difficult to understand, many users may not give their informed consent. . . .